When it comes to the rights of others, I don’t play politics. It is the right thing to do.

U.S. Senator Everett Dirksen, Republican from Illinois, defended his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Click share this, on the right, to LIKE this article on Facebook or TWEET it on Twitter!

Olympia Snowe, Republican U.S. Senator from Maine, announced her retirement, citing the ugly partisanship that has veiled Washington politics of today. She is of a dying breed of Republican: the kind that doesn’t allow extremism to pollute the ideals on which the party of Lincoln was founded, the progressive mission to help the poor and needy which TR aspired, and the fight for civil rights and equality that Illinois’ Everett Dirksen pursued.
"When it comes to the rights of others, I don’t play politics. It is the right thing to do," Dirksen defended his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Snowe is of the same spirit, defying her own party, to advocate for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender rights. Yes. She has her flaws, but which politician doesn’t? Snowe will be missed, as I do the progressive type of Republicanism that leaves Capitol Hill with her.
LGBT Record: Snowe voted yes for the Defense of Marriage Act in 1996 but has been seen as a most likely affirmative vote in current efforts to overturn it. She voted twice against a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. She voted in favor of adding gender and sexual orientation to Federal hate crime laws. She voted in favor of a law banning job discrimination based on sexual orientation. She signed the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.
Click share this, on the right, to LIKE this article on Facebook or TWEET it on Twitter!

Olympia Snowe, Republican U.S. Senator from Maine, announced her retirement, citing the ugly partisanship that has veiled Washington politics of today. She is of a dying breed of Republican: the kind that doesn’t allow extremism to pollute the ideals on which the party of Lincoln was founded, the progressive mission to help the poor and needy which TR aspired, and the fight for civil rights and equality that Illinois’ Everett Dirksen pursued.

"When it comes to the rights of others, I don’t play politics. It is the right thing to do," Dirksen defended his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Snowe is of the same spirit, defying her own party, to advocate for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender rights. Yes. She has her flaws, but which politician doesn’t? Snowe will be missed, as I do the progressive type of Republicanism that leaves Capitol Hill with her.

LGBT Record: Snowe voted yes for the Defense of Marriage Act in 1996 but has been seen as a most likely affirmative vote in current efforts to overturn it. She voted twice against a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. She voted in favor of adding gender and sexual orientation to Federal hate crime laws. She voted in favor of a law banning job discrimination based on sexual orientation. She signed the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.

Click share this, on the right, to LIKE this article on Facebook or TWEET it on Twitter!